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A bit of a word of caution concerning older homes.

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Big Lew

This IS My Life
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There have been warnings about building products containing asbestos used in old
houses etc for many years as being a serious health issue if disturbed. Although not
quite as serious, water leakage can be a health issue as well if it allows molds to thrive
and spread. One of the ways leakage can occur is from copper water pipes deteriorating
as the years go by. Sometimes this can occur relatively early depending on the type of
minerals in the water. I was warned of this problem when having my hot water tank
replaced a short while ago. My house was 46 years old at the time. Apparently copper
pipes can wear thin and begin to leak between 35 and 50 years of constant use. Although
I had planned to get it done then, I continued to put it off. I just had a local plumbing company
come in and it took them almost 2 days. Right off the bat they found that the main line coming
into and up a wall was seriously weeping. After thoroughly inspecting the area, they found no
rot or mold. Man am I lucky and happy that I didn't put the expensive and difficult job off any
longer. They found no other seepage problems but they did see many oxidization spots which
are the prelude to leakage problems. So in conclusion, for those with houses 40 years or older
that still have the original copper water lines, be aware. The company that just did my house did
so with a minimum of wall and ceiling openings, and with the anticipated municipal inspection
passing on Monday, I'm very pleased at the price considering all that was done. Pm me if you wish
to learn more about the company.
 
Thread starter #3

Big Lew

This IS My Life
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Post them up if you want Dave, anything that helps our members is NOT taboo here.
I just might do that after the inspection is passed. They pointed out some code issues
with some drainage pipes related to my clothes washer and dishwasher. They said they
would try and accommodate the inspector without additional charge if he gets picky.
 
Thread starter #4

Big Lew

This IS My Life
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Well, what a busy last few days! At any rate, all the plumbing work passed without
any concerns. Plumber in charge of the work must have a pretty good reputation with
the nit picky inspectors because they didn't insist on a second pressure check while in
their presence. I would highly recommend "Tap To Drain" as they did good work, kept
the collateral damage to the walls and ceiling to a minimum, fixed or added several items
without charge they thought should be done that weren't in the contract or up to code,
and did all the work at what I thing was a very good price. Last year I had my hot water tank
replaced which cost me just under $1000 even though I supplied the tank myself right to the
same room. Those plumbers, according to the inspector, didn't install the earthquake strap,
nor did they insulate the pipes as per code. "Tap To Drain" made the changes, added the
metal earthquake strap, and installed the required pipe insulation for free....and it all cost
me $3998 in total including the permit and taxes.
 
Last edited:

wideopenthrottle

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saw this in the news: plumbing recall

Canadians with Kitec plumbing may be eligible for compensation in class action
A type of plumbing sold between 1995 and 2007 may be a flood waiting to happen in your home, but the Kitec products are the subject of a class-action lawsuit that has been settled for tens of millions of dollars, so homeowners are eligible for partial compensation to pay for repairs.
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'It was very widely used,' says plumber who has seen the damage caused by burst pipes
CBC News · Posted: Jan 03, 2019 5:00 AM AT | Last Updated: January 3


Plumber Dimitri Papoulis has seen his share of homes with Kitec pipes and fittings. He says at some point, the piping will fail. (Stephanie Clattenburg/CBC)
A type of plumbing sold between 1995 and 2007 may be a flood waiting to happen in your home, but the good news is the Kitec products are the subject of a class-action lawsuit that has been settled for tens of millions of dollars, so homeowners are eligible for partial compensation to pay for repairs.
"It was very widely used," Halifax plumbing company owner Dimitri Papoulis said, noting it was popular because it was inexpensive.
Papoulis said Kitec was the "go-to pipe" for most heating companies in the early 2000s and late 1990s before it was recalled because both the fittings and pipes were prone to deterioration.

Kitec, billed as a cheaper and easy-to-install alternative to copper piping, was used across Canada primarily in hot water baseboard and in-floor heating systems, according to a 2013 brochure published by the Nova Scotia Real Estate Commission. It says the plumbing consists of "flexible aluminum pipe between an inner and outer layer of plastic pipe (PEX pipe) with brass fittings."
Look for bright orange or bright blue
The product may also have other brand names, including PlumbBetter, IPEX AQUA and WarmRite.
It can be identified by its bright orange (hot water) and bright blue (cold water) covering. The piping is also labelled with "ASTM 1281."


Kitec pipes can be identified by their bright orange and blue colours. (http://www.kitecsettlement.com)
Papoulis said often, the problem is with the Kitec fittings.
"It mostly happens on well water because of the mineral content, the acidity of the water," he said. "It chews away the brass fittings."
'It will fail'
The other issue is the piping itself. Over time, the plastic pipe and aluminum expand and contract at different temperatures, and that can cause them to burst.
"It will fail. It's only a matter of time," Papoulis said.


Some of the fittings used for Kitec pipes that may degrade and cause flooding. (http://www.kitecsettlement.com)
He said the cost of replacing Kitec depends on a number of factors, including the size of the home, but it can range from $4,000 to $15,000.
Kitec was recalled and subsequently the subject of a class-action lawsuit in Canada and the United States that was settled for $125 million US. The settlement says homeowners are eligible for 50 per cent of the average cost to repair or replace the piping and fittings. Even those who have not had an issue with the product can apply for compensation. Homeowners have until January 2020 to make a claim.
Most homeowners unaware
It's not known how many homes in Canada have Kitec, but the class-action settlement site estimates there are approximately 292,000 installations/properties with the Kitec system in North America.
Halifax-area real estate agent Jacqui Rostek says Kitec is an issue that comes up with both buyers and sellers, and that she sees "a couple of dozen times a year."
"In my experience, sellers that bought their house in 2011 or before are usually completely oblivious to the fact that there's potentially an issue with the pipes," she told CBC News.
One easy way homeowners can check whether their home has Kitec is to look for the bright orange or blue pipes leading from their hot water heater or their hot water baseboards.
Insurance companies have varied response
Papoulis said there is no consistency on how different insurance companies deal with Kitec in homes.
He said some will pay to replace it, others will insure homes but at a higher rate and others give homeowners a certain amount of time to replace it or lose their insurance.
He has also found some homes where Kitec was used long after it was recalled.
He said it's important to know whether you have the product so you can decide what, if anything, to do about it. He has seen basements flooded by broken fittings and pipes, and said everyone should know how to turn off their water in the event their pipes break.
 

mossler

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Well now, I have Kitec on the hot water side just around the boiler. It's on my "to-replace" this year.

In Feb 2016, we had a real nasty cold snap in Toronto and my 100+ year old house had a hidden feature: a poorly repaired copper line. They user a T bar to fix a previous pipe burst, but did not cut enough of the old material. So the weak area ... burst. Thankfully I was home that day and reacted fast enough. But boy, what a mess.

1546788320664.png

After all that I have found when doing minor renos, I am tempted not to look behind the wall anymore. :grumpy:
 

mossler

New Member
Messages
15
Likes
18
Location
East York
saw this in the news: plumbing recall

Canadians with Kitec plumbing may be eligible for compensation in class action
A type of plumbing sold between 1995 and 2007 may be a flood waiting to happen in your home, but the Kitec products are the subject of a class-action lawsuit that has been settled for tens of millions of dollars, so homeowners are eligible for partial compensation to pay for repairs.
Thanks for sharing this. Found the site and submitted my claim.
 
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