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Baby its cold outside (banned)

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Well, new heights of silly (paid people) in the CBC have banned this song because of a reference to get cozy over a few drinks. This ban started in the US at some radio stations. To the credit of Canadians the move by CBC has been huge ... in condemnation and ridicule.

"Baby, It's Cold Outside" has been considered a holiday classic ever since it won the Academy Award for best original song in the film "Neptune's Daughter."
It's since been covered countless times by singers Ray Charles and Betty Carter, Idina Menzel and Michael Buble, as well as Dolly Parton and Rod Stewart."
 

CF8889

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Meh, I feel like people are too over-reactive to these kinds of things. The PC crowd gets a win occasionally.. the world changes with each new decade. Always has, always will

But Trump is still president, Jim Jefferies is still selling out venues, and Brock Turner is living his life outside of prison..

So a song doesn't play on CBC, I'll still wake up tomorrow the same. Might even rewatch a Jim Jefferies special.
 
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Next will be Rudolf the "Red Nose Reindeer" because it has lyrics pertaining to bullying or "Away in a Manger" because it stereotypes homeless people :Doh!:
RED NOSE!!!!!!!!!!!!! (operation red nose ) ''drunken caribou!!! REMOVE THEM FROM OUR QUARTERS......while we are at it ! remove the beaver from the nickel... OOH! I SEE THIS POST AND THREADS TAKING ON A LIFE OF ITS OWN !
 

Iron Glove

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Listened to the song the other day in conjunction with the video of it and yes, I can see where there might be concern but heck, there's way worse crap out there in those days and far, far worse today. I'll keep singing it ( have Wife's permission ) with a clear conscience.
Censorship of music has been going on for ever. A couple of examples from many of our childhoods:
Johnny Horton singing about the "bloody British" in the Battle of New Orleans. Many stations refused to play it or bleeped out "bloody."
Barry McGuire singing "take a look at Selma Alabama" referring to the hate in the World in Eve of Destruction. Many Deep South stations refused to play the song.
Ed Sullivan in 1967 insisting that the Stones sing "lets spend some time together" instead of "let's spend the night together."
I remember my then 5 year old Grandaughter giving me heck for saying poop as "Auntie so and so says poop is a bad word." Texted my Daughter telling her that because of this I will now refer to "poop" when talking to my Grand Girl as "a huge heaping pile of (--)."
 

CF8889

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What station was it that wouldn't let Johnny Cash sing the line "wishing lord, that I was stoned" performing live...

..of course when he saw Kris K sitting in the crowd.. he wasn't about to butcher his song....

I believe Johnny was then banned from performing on said station again.
 

Big Lew

This IS My Life
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And then there was the refusal to play Jimmy Dean's "One hell of a man" in 'Big Bad John'
so he had to change it to 'One heck of a man' which was simply knit picking foolish. It took
many years before the original song was aired again. As was pointed out, there are so many
'singers and artists' rapping out totally vulgar, obscene, and sexually explicit stuff all over
the entertainment world now....far worse than anything done in the past that is being
criticized by the 'politically correct busybodies of today.
 

KH4

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“It's now very common to hear people say, 'I'm rather offended by that.' As if that gives them certain rights. It's actually nothing more... than a whine. 'I find that offensive.' It has no meaning; it has no purpose; it has no reason to be respected as a phrase. 'I am offended by that.' Well, so f&%$ing what."
- Stephen Fry, The Guardian, 5 June 2005
 

CF8889

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From a selfish stand point... I actually kinda love the over PC crowd.

My whole teenage years were filled with older people getting mad/offended by my music, clothes, speech, attitude... basically telling me to change everything I liked to fit an image they wanted...

Now 20years old kids are doing the same thing to the people that did it to me.. and it's driving the old people crazy. Cracks me right up!

Maybe I'm a bit of a d^*k, but it gets a good laugh from me haha
 

Big Lew

This IS My Life
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“It's now very common to hear people say, 'I'm rather offended by that.' As if that gives them certain rights. It's actually nothing more... than a whine. 'I find that offensive.' It has no meaning; it has no purpose; it has no reason to be respected as a phrase. 'I am offended by that.' Well, so f&%$ing what."
- Stephen Fry, The Guardian, 5 June 2005
I really like this response!!
 

Foxton Gundogs

Admin./CERTIFIED GOOSE/PRAW..... Cedar BC
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You are so right Nov I offended people by riding a chopper, wearing leather, cowboy boots, and T shirts, driving a loud "hot rod" etc. But back in the day it was people bit*hing to their cronies but it was never forced on others who did not believe it was offensive. Now a days with social media etc it is forced on us whether we believe it or not. I have only one thing to say.
Happy Holidays

MERRY CHRISTMAS
EVERY ONE
 

KH4

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I dunno, did people get visibly and publicly offended by others wearing a crucifix around the neck or wishing someone Merry Christmas or being called a 'he' or 'she 20, 30, 40, 50 years ago?
 
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I dunno, did people get visibly and publicly offended by others wearing a crucifix around the neck or wishing someone Merry Christmas or being called a 'he' or 'she 20, 30, 40, 50 years ago?
where I grew up there was a very active pecking order where you would get beat up for things like glasses or braces for running shoes that were too new, for looking at someone the wrong way.....for getting a hair cut...for wearing patches on jeans...for taking the wrong route home from school...for showing up someone bigger than you in any way....for having a name that rhymes with anything nasty....need I go on!!!!
 

Foxton Gundogs

Admin./CERTIFIED GOOSE/PRAW..... Cedar BC
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Best thing I ever seen was a "tough" picking on a very vulnerable kid. One of the girls in our group told the Bully to F off and cut him down for the possible size of his manhood. He pushed her, big mistake before we knew it he was on the ground crying with blood streaming from his nose. Never pi$$ of a 98 lb kick boxer. lol
 

KH4

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I think the culture we are describing here is Snowflake or Snowflake Generation:

1) a person perceived by others to have an inflated sense of uniqueness or an unwarranted sense of entitlement, or to be over-emotional, easily offended, and unable to deal with opposing opinions.

2) a neologistic term used to characterize the young adults of the 2010s as being more prone to taking offense and less resilient than previous generations, or as being too emotionally vulnerable to cope with views that challenge their own.
 

Big Lew

This IS My Life
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I dunno, did people get visibly and publicly offended by others wearing a crucifix around the neck or wishing someone Merry Christmas or being called a 'he' or 'she 20, 30, 40, 50 years ago?
No, and I couldn't care less if they're offended when I call people 'he', 'she', father, mother,
girl, boy, young man or young lady today and tomorrow.
 
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