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Been Thinking........

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Trinity

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Winter blues setting in, more in house projects which really means more quality computer time:yeah, right:. l'm surfing some of our hunt sites taking in what ever takes my fancy. Some posts l've read really got me thinking how long our hunting heritage will survive. Not talking govt interference although that can play a significant part. More referring to our changing world, the impact technology has had on hunting, means of reaching the back country, urban sprawl and more hunting pressure which contributes to and will continue to affect hunting opportunities.
Having lived in the same rural country place for the better part of 40 years, l can attest to the fact of how much human encroachment has changed animal behavior and movement. Where as once upon l time it wasn't if we seen deer on a drive at any hour of the day, it was how many.....not so any more. Read a really good story of a fellows hunt on another site few years back that started with "hunting" on google earth and the ending with a buck any one of us would have been proud to call our own. Point is, with out the use of technology, there is a very good chance it would never have happened. Another story....invited a buddy to our successful hunting area up around Hixon one year. He went up a day early as his schedule allowed. By the time we got there, he had narrowed the country to 3 different areas he thought we should hunt. Two of those spots were indeed our "honey holes".......google earth, and gps are your friend. Those 2 spots represented 8 years of learning the country by hunting and a lot of boot miles. My buddy had never been there. Yet another group l know pushes in 2-3 days with their quads into the back country where no roads exist. Different group of 1/2 dozen guys of which l know go one, into an area with 4-6 trail cams each......doesn't take long to figure out if the country is holding any critters. Once they find a productive area, trail cams are focused on it and by the time hunting season rolls around, its very surprising to hear they didn't connect with something first day.
Not out to judge any ones hunting style as l own a few bean field rifles, gps, laser rangefinder,trail cams, s x s, 4 wheel drive pick up and most of the toys we "need" to be successful. Guess l'm just wondering out loud where we are going with it and what the face of hunting will look like 50 years given how far we have come in the last 20.
 

KH4

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There no doubt that our wild places are slowly being erroded away, and the backcountry hunt could become an idea of the past.

However, one thing to keep in mind is that the states have 10x more people, and way more animals than us, so human development is not the sole restricting element. The one thing we do have is a lot more public land, land that we need to defend to maintain that hunting heritage so many of us value.

Technology can help us and hurt us. The same quad that got someone 10km into the backcountry could have scared 10 deer within 100 m on the trip in.

Trail cams are an interesting topic, as I think the original thought was to have one or two near your tree stand or honey hole. Now, with the costs coming down, folks have armies of trail cams 'scouting' for them, and now they have ones with SIM cards that can send you an instantaneous picture when triggered, pending cell service. I see BC hasn't weighed in on that one yet.

Are these tools making people more successful, or are they a handicap advantage due to dwindling wildlife numbers and increased pressure? Tough to come up with a definitive answer.

The hunting 'industry' will continue to come up with the latest and greatest gear, so advancements in technology are inevitable as people want to make a buck. The idea that there's a special niche product for any and every hunt and species is a little bit crazy. "Didn't get that buck this year? Well next year you need this new merino thong and watch you bag that buck next season....."
 

Big Lew

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No doubt that all the recent technology you mention can help greatly for those intent on
using it, but as they say, "to each their own". I don't use atvs, trail cams, google or gps,
nor do I use illegal drones, heat seeking technology, or night vision glasses, yet I still am
able to find game...and if offered a good high percentage shot, I do so just like I used to
when I first started hunting nearly 60 yers ago.
As for the loss of public wilderness hunting areas, yes, I agree. Most of the great spots I
enjoyed hunting while seldom seeing others has been inundated with many hunters, or
it has been carved up with new ranches, urban hobby farms, and cabins. Places like the
north side of Dewdney Trunk from Haney all the way to Stave lake used to be wilderness.
Now there are literally 100's of small acreage homes throughout that area. Same with
much of the cariboo, including the central and western plateau now have people living on
all manner of properties from recent large ranches to lakeside cabins....and along with these
new people comes the 'no trespassing' and 'no hunting signs.'
 

sealevel

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I was a student of all this hunting technology. had game cameras, range finders and a room full of gadgets . after a couple cameras quit working and i lost a real good range finder ....i said enough i am going back to basic . i wear a gray standfields and a pair of wool pants . i pack a rifle, knife,matches and a piece of rope and very little else . i still use a quad just to get around , i keep food and an axe on it ....
 

olympia

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I was a student of all this hunting technology. had game cameras, range finders and a room full of gadgets . after a couple cameras quit working and i lost a real good range finder ....i said enough i am going back to basic . i wear a gray standfields and a pair of wool pants . i pack a rifle, knife,matches and a piece of rope and very little else . i still use a quad just to get around , i keep food and an axe on it ....

You just summed me up minus the quad, lol I have a dirtbike and an old Honda trike and the rest is boots to the ground and road hunting.
 

Finaddict

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Base camp is the truck camper, my transportation is the old tracker and it has enough survival gear for a few days if necessary. I am usually boots on the ground within a couple miles of the tracker. I carry GPS to get me back to the Tracker if necessary and a range finder to train myself about distances in any stand. I may also carry a VHF radio if I am not hunting alone. That is my technology. Not for the hunt, just to get me back from it.
 

Big Lew

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I have owned and used GPS units and do admit they are really great and accurate devices,
but being 'old school' I can't bring myself to solely depending on them. I still rely on my trusted
compass and other means to go into and back out of the woods. Don't need batteries or
complicated electronics that could fail when using old tried and true methods.
 

Finaddict

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I have owned and used GPS units and do admit they are really great and accurate devices,
but being 'old school' I can't bring myself to solely depending on them. I still rely on my trusted
compass and other means to go into and back out of the woods. Don't need batteries or
complicated electronics that could fail when using old tried and true methods.
100% agree BL. But if I do like to hike alone and in the relatively flat interior where trees could obscure all landmarks, if I get turned around, or have an issue or an accident and need help, A VHF and exact coordinates could be handy.
 

Big Lew

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As I said, I used to have a gps years ago. Even then it was quite accurate and ideal
for recording your path so that you could return right back to your starting point or
any waypoint you marked. If my health allows me to get back into getting out there
I most likely will get another one...but I still will also rely on my compass and observation etc.
 

gunseller

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I have used GPS and even played the game of finding locations other have posted. I always carry a compost compass and map. Last time I checked they always work even if some clown around the world does something stupid. I have been dropped off and told you will be picked up at a set point at a stated time. If you miss time by more than 15minutes you have several thousand mile walk home. I hunt a lot with a muzzle loader. I mean a real muzzle loader. One that uses a #11 cap or a rock in the jaws and real black powder and a patched round ball. I usually follow the kiss system. Don't go for all the high tec even though I sell a.lot.of.it. For the most part I don't even wear camo. I believe in hunting not buying a game animal with high tec toys.
Steve
 
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