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Biltong - Anybody experienced in making it?

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stevo911

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I keep hearing about it, and want to make it, but am trying to figure out a good space to make it. Living in a condo I don't have a garage, but I do have patio with a deck above me I can hang stuff from the underside. There's not any great ways I can come up with to get a fan blowing on it, and I"d be inclined to use a game bag or something to cut down on bugs, but that will reduce airflow more. Any brilliant ideas?
 
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It is definitely not a hard thing to do Steve. The biggest problem for the home user/maker of biltong is getting the pieces cut properly after they are well marinated and dried.

Galloping Goose Sausage Company (link) - GALLOPING GOOSE - make a very, very good version of biltong. As a matter of fact, he has n original cutting machine that was brought with him when he immigrated.
 
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stevo911

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I just googled it and I found a thing called a Biltong Box. I also found a recipe that you can do in the oven. I have never made that stuff but I have done jerky in the oven.
I saw the biltong box, but figured it's a quick way to get myself on the wife's (--) list, building more things that we need to store :p

It is definitely not a hard thing to do Steve. The biggest problem for the home user/maker of biltong is getting the pieces cut properly after they are well marinated and dried.

Galloping Goose Sausage Company (link) - GALLOPING GOOSE - make a very, very good version of biltong. As a matter of fact, he has n original cutting machine that was brought with him when he immigrated.
Thanks for the tip Dan, I'll definitely check out their stuff before I get too carried away getting myself set up to make it.
 
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stevo911

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Can't say I've heard of Moosemeat and Marmalade. It was on an Anthony Bourdain thing I was watching the other day, and it's randomly come up in non cooking/game related stuff too.
 
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stevo911

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Why not both?!
On multi-day hikes I get sick of dried fruit/nuts/jerky it's always nice to have more variety.
From what I gather depending on how the billtong is done, it can be less dry, and less salty than jerky, with a more meaty flavour, which all sounds good to me!
 

wideopenthrottle

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Can't say I've heard of Moosemeat and Marmalade. It was on an Anthony Bourdain thing I was watching the other day, and it's randomly come up in non cooking/game related stuff too.
it is a show about a brit chef (Dan Hayes who resides/has a restaurant in Victoria) and a native guy (Art Napoleon-self porclaimed bush chef)....they do shows in Canada as well as ones in Britain...It has a fair bit of humour and my wife is British so we enjoy the show together....I am going to try the Jamacan Jerk goat with some of the last of my deer meat (currently thawing) in the next couple of days
 
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check out GUNSITE SOUTH AFRICA......... the BOERS (DUTCH) have a great hunting sight and as NOG said,its THEIR form of jerky... some have a room dedicated to its making.....
glenn
 
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Why not both?!
On multi-day hikes I get sick of dried fruit/nuts/jerky it's always nice to have more variety.
From what I gather depending on how the billtong is done, it can be less dry, and less salty than jerky, with a more meaty flavour, which all sounds good to me!
If I remember correctly - it is a bit softer to chew as compared with the jerky that we are familiar with. AND - less salty too. different flavor profile with the coriander and seasonings.
 
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stevo911

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If I remember correctly - it is a bit softer to chew as compared with the jerky AND - less salty too.
Those are two big selling points for me. Plus I love coriander!

That would be greatly appreciated if you could post that stuff up Spy!
 
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From the Galloping Goose Sausage Co. website...
BILTONG - Traditional Southern African jerky. Marinated in cloves, allspice, coriander and sherry to enhance the natural beef flavour.
I remember Johan (the owner) hanging the chunks right in the prep room (off to one side) and setting up a regular home-type fan on low speed so that it blew a nice breeze over the meat. Dried in a couple days....
 

IronNoggin

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Sure do give me a day or two to dig it out and I will give instructions on how to hang aswell...
I'll be checking this thread for your recipes when I get back from the North Buddy!
Just a friendly little reminder for now...
Should give you damn near three weeks to get it together... :ROFL:

Cheers,
Nog
 
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The leg makes the best pieces for Biltong, or other larger, whole pieces of meat.

Bone out the leg as a whole so you get large pieces of meat. You want to process those large pieces into long strips (with the grain) that are about 1.5 inches square. Or even 1 inch square. The meat can even be processed into thick flat slabs and then cut across the slab - as thin or as thick as you desire. Thin is usually the preferred way because it is dry and very chewy.

The larger the square chunks the longer they need to marinate and to air-dry. The dried strips are then cut very thinly across the face of the square.


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Here's a simple recipe for you to experiment with....

INGREDIENTS
  • 2 kg meat
  • 100 ml brown sugar
  • 30 ml coarse salt
  • 15ml bicarbonate soda (this softens the meat)
  • 125ml crushed coriander seeds
  • 125 ml red wine vinegar
  • 1 tbsp cracked black pepper
  • 1 tbsp paprika or chili flakes
The sugar, salt, coriander, pepper, and chili flakes can be adjusted to suit your personal preference. Either add more or delete some.

INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Slice the meat, with the grain into 1cm thick x 2cm wide strips and about 20cm in length and rub thoroughly with the vinegar.
  2. Mix the salt, sugar, crushed coriander seeds, bicarbonate of soda, black pepper and paprika together in a bowl to form a rubbing mixture.
  3. Rub the spice mixture into the pieces of meat thoroughly.
  4. Take a glass or stainless steel container and layer the meat, making sure the thicker pieces are at the bottom.
  5. Cover the container with cling film and refrigerate for about 12 hrs mixing every couple of hours so that the meat flavors evenly.
  6. Hang up to dry in a well ventilated spot.
Drying time is about 4-5 days, depending on the weather, and your personal preference.

Although naturally dried is preferred, to speed up the drying time - place a fan about 5 feet away from the hung meat and run it on low speed. This will cut the time down to about 2 - 3 days.
 
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stevo911

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Thanks Dan! I've got some old computer towers, I was going to turn one into a temporary biltong box (gut the tower except the power supply and fans, maybe an incandescent bulb for some heat).
Seems like it should do the trick.
 
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To hang your Biltong at home you can use large paper clips that can be bent into hooks for each piece of meat and then suspend each individual piece from a wooden dowel or any stick that will hold the weight. Suspend the dowels (or sticks) between two chairs if there is no other way to get the meat off the ground for drying. All that is necessary is for the meat to be in a bug-free environment and have a decent air flow in and around each individual piece.

There will be some dripping of fluids - so be prepared for a little mess on the floor.

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stevo911

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Yeah, my main concerns being drip page and keeping it away from the dog (one of those being more of a concern than the other, since being in a condo it'll probably be in my kitchen, dining room or patio that it happens, my pooches 3 fave spots) :)
 
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Ok got a buck down last weekend, he is hanging for now, Im making biltong & Borewors out of him I will takes lots of pics and describe in detail how too... Be patient my fiends
Excellent! I knew you'd get around to it! :Oh Yeah!:

Congrats on the deer! :applause:
Any story to go with??

Right Looking Forward to the pix, recipes and descriptions of both the Biltong and Borewors Buddy! small wink

Cheers!
Matt
 
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From a mate in SOUTH AFRICA, for IMPALA,or Blue Wildabeast but figure it would work for us.
per 1 kilo of meat,
4 tablespoons salt
1tablespoon coarse black pepper
1 tablespoon crushed chilli spice
125 ml. vinegar....red wine or ''brown''.
roll meat in dry ingreadiences and sprinkle with the vinegar.
cover and let sit, 8-12 hours
hang to dry 3-5 days.........you sample !!
he also sometimes adds BRANDY,BROWN SUGAR AND WORCHESTER SAUCE and a variety of personal favorite spices...........me, I never tried it........glenn
 
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