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Dangerous time of the year!

Thread starter #1

Big Lew

This IS My Life
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Mission B.C.
Pedestrians! Self preservation might save your life!
It's not enough to think just because you might have the right of way when crossing
a street even within a marked crosswalk that you are safe. You have a responsibility
to beware of your surroundings, to make sure drivers can see you, and to give drivers
a chance to know that you intend to cross in front of them. One of the reasons I decided
to retire from driving commercially, including the daily long commute, was because of
difficulty in seeing pedestrians and cyclists, especially at this time of year when it's so dark
and rainy. I'm amazed that a lot more pedestrians and cyclists aren't hurt or killed because
they either don't pay attention or arrogantly step out in front of vehicles because they
technically have the right of way. Far to often I see people step off the curb and into traffic
without even looking up, never mind right or left. All too frequently I see people walking close
to, or within the driving lanes at night while wearing all black clothing. How, for Pete's sake do
you think drivers can see you, especially if having to contend with the bright lights of oncoming
traffic? The same thing goes for using marked crosswalks...before stepping off that curb,
make sure drivers see you!
I've seen and investigated far too many people struck by vehicles
because they didn't practice self preservation! That's my rant for the day.
 
Last edited:

gunseller

Long-Time Member
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IOwa
Down here we have the same things happening. Worst where there is a cycle lane. Some on cycles act like that gives them the whole road even the right to pull over in front of you when you are doing 55mph and they are doing 5. It is a wander more are not kill.
Steve
 
Thread starter #4

Big Lew

This IS My Life
Messages
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1,956
Location
Mission B.C.
Down here we have the same things happening. Worst where there is a cycle lane. Some on cycles act like that gives them the whole road even the right to pull over in front of you when you are doing 55mph and they are doing 5. It is a wander more are not kill.
Steve
Even though I used to be a cyclist, including doing my endurance training in cities like Vancouver,
I can't understand that attitude so many cyclists have that they're special and don't have to obey
the rules. From riding through stop signs and stop lights, going the wrong way on one way streets,
suddenly changing lanes back and forth without signaling, and many cases, not even looking, illegally
riding on sidewalks, and the list goes on. Likely because of my job, I usually obeyed the rules and laws.
I will say though that at one time I used to participate in a yearly 75 km MS charity ride (race). The
police would hold back traffic so we could race through red lights etc and it was fun. I actually won first
place once in the mt bike category, but when they didn't do that anymore, it wasn't nearly as much fun.
 

KH4

Well-Known Member
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Location
Kootenays
I've seen a increasing trend of pedestrians and cyclists feeling like they have the right of way over vehicles. Establishing eye contact was always something I was taught.

They must establish that it is safe to cross, and not just start walking across without stopping, assuming it's okay. I point this out to my wife all the time, pedestrians walking without looking, either up from their phone or otherwise.

I've always used the road like I'm a guest and that while I might be 'right' I may become dead and that's no use to me. I take extra caution and when in doubt, give way to vehicles.

I've never understood folks on the coast (especially) who wear black, use a black umbrella, and proceed to walk around the streets in the rain and dark. I've almost hit a pedestrian in a crosswalk turning left because I could not seen them between the rain, light glare off the road and the fact that my lights face forward not to my left. They were essentially invisible, really good camouflage!

Most cyclists drive me nuts, either follow the rules of the road, or don't, you can't switch to whatever rules suit you, and for god's sake, if you can pull over to then shoulder to let a vehicle pass, do it, I didn't plan my commute time based on riding behind a bike!

And if you're going to jay walk you should NEVER make a vehicle stop for you, wait until if totally clear.

Sadly, many of the pedestrian strikes in the LML are due to pedestrian error, hence the campaign last year to 'be seen'.

Here's the law, among many others in the Act:

Rights of way between vehicle and pedestrian
179 (1)Subject to section 180, the driver of a vehicle must yield the right of way to a pedestrian where traffic control signals are not in place or not in operation when the pedestrian is crossing the highway in a crosswalk and the pedestrian is on the half of the highway on which the vehicle is travelling, or is approaching so closely from the other half of the highway that he or she is in danger.
(2)A pedestrian must not leave a curb or other place of safety and walk or run into the path of a vehicle that is so close it is impracticable for the driver to yield the right of way.
(3)If a vehicle is slowing down or stopped at a crosswalk or at an intersection to permit a pedestrian to cross the highway, the driver of a vehicle approaching from the rear must not overtake and pass the vehicle that is slowing down or stopped.
(4)A pedestrian, cyclist or the driver of a motor vehicle must obey the instructions of an adult school crossing guard and of a school student acting as a member of a traffic patrol where the guards or students are
(a)provided under the School Act,
(b)authorized by the chief of police of the municipality as defined in section 36 (1), or
(c)if located on treaty lands, authorized by the chief of the police force responsible for policing the treaty lands.
Crossing at other than crosswalk
180 When a pedestrian is crossing a highway at a point not in a crosswalk, the pedestrian must yield the right of way to a vehicle.
 

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