Welcome to True North Outdoor Hunting Forum - British Columbia and Beyond

It looks like you haven't created an account yet. Why not take a minute to register for your own free account now? As a member you get free access to all of our forums and posts plus the ability to post your own messages, communicate directly with other members and much more.

Register Log in

Dry Fire

Thread starter #1

RoscoeP

Long-Time Member
Messages
916
Likes
1
Not me, but I was out with a buddy today doing a round of 3-D and were on the 10th target, I was not watching my friend but was distracted by something else when Bam! My friend is like what the hell was that? As I looked at his bow I could see his peep dangling on the rubber cord and his string and cables were derailed. I said you dry fired your bow, you must not have had an arrow on. He said that he did but when I said to count your arrows and he did, he said s*,t, no I didn't. Well that was the end of the day for him as he wanted to go to the shop where he bought it and get it checked out. I shot a couple more targets but it started raining and I called it a day myself. I had lost a good arrow on the 3rd target on what looked like an 11 but my arrow had blown through as the target was pretty shot up. I went back and had another little look for it but no luck.I have not talked to my friend yet to see how his bow was. I hope it is alright and I doubt he will do that again. Cheers
 

Shooter

Long-Time Member
Messages
836
Likes
1
Location
Vancouver Island
Crap that sucks. When I read the title I thought you dry fired your new Energy. What bow did he dry fire? With any luck its just a set of strings and cables.
 
Thread starter #4

RoscoeP

Long-Time Member
Messages
916
Likes
1
Crap that sucks. When I read the title I thought you dry fired your new Energy. What bow did he dry fire? With any luck its just a set of strings and cables.
It is a new Hoyt Ignite, more an entry level bow but it is very nice, came with sight, rest and quiver. I talked to him a little while ago and it is all OK, they checked it over put the string and cables back on and also the peep, they charged him $10, I really felt for him, I know how I would have felt if I had done it to any of my bows.
 
Messages
36,481
Likes
1,563
Location
6200 km Away.
Hoyt are very good about their bows. They do a number of dry fires before their bows leave the factory. At least I know they do that for their high-end bows - I'm hoping that they do it for all their bows.

I'm not saying a dry fire in the field is OK to do, but it should not affect the limbs - ie. cracking them...

$10 is a small fee to pay for peace of mind. :kewl:
 

Shooter

Long-Time Member
Messages
836
Likes
1
Location
Vancouver Island
On a stupidity note tho.......











I was working on my bow getting it tuned up the other night after putting new strings on it and I drew it without my draw stops in by accident.:Doh!: I rolled the cams over and locked it up at full draw. Luckily I have my press and draw board right there so I pressed it really quickly to take the pressure off the cables and that allowed me to roll the cams back and start to let my press down. With my portable press tho I can't let it all the way down after shortening it up enough to press a full draw bow. So I let it down as much as I could and then proceeded to put it in my draw board to draw it back enough to take the pressure of my press and then could let it all the way down with my draw board. No harm done but its pretty scary sitting there looking at a bow locked up at full draw. Realistically tho I don't believe that there is any danger in it exploding into a dry fire. The cables are locked up straight across post to post so the cams are locked and cant move. The scariest part is trying to get my synunm press to press limbs that are that deflected.
 

BCROB

New Member
Messages
0
Likes
0
Location
Crawford
tell him to take a couple cotton balls and rub his limbs all over , it will pick up any fractures or hairlines your fingers may not feel ........it works
if the cotton doesn't snag he should be good to go (as far as the limbs go), any idea on the poundage he was pullin ?? hopefully its ok , that's lousy regardless
 
Thread starter #9

RoscoeP

Long-Time Member
Messages
916
Likes
1
When I pressed my new Elite the other day on my press(Bow time machine) it came with 2 red fingers that I used on the outside so I did not have to remove the limb stops. Only took a couple on minutes to change the press then no chance of forgetting and having that problem you described. My bow felt much better today with the weight I removed of the stabs, but my buddy's dry fire put a damper on the day, but a couple of beers and all is good. Cheers
 
Thread starter #10

RoscoeP

Long-Time Member
Messages
916
Likes
1
Well my friend did it again today, dry fire that is. Another friend of mine loaned him a Carter "evolution" to try, it is a tension activated release with a safety. For some reason he decided to pull it back and let down a few times, with no arrow on of course and you know what happened. I think he must have relaxed his thumb on the safety and it fired, peep is off again and broken in half and string and cables derailed again. The string is getting more frayed on the serving and he should at least order another one right now.
So he will be going to CR tomorrow to get it checked and fixed up, I hope that is the last time he does that.
 
Thread starter #12

RoscoeP

Long-Time Member
Messages
916
Likes
1
Well, I don't know, but I think I'm fast losing confidence in your friend's ability to actually "get" things....
I hear ya, we only live about 3 houses apart and he said he was going to call me before he shot that release. I had told him if you shoot it before to stand real close to your target until you get the feel for it. I guess didn't figure that would mean there would be an arrow involved, I know I have told him before to never draw a bow without an arrow, nothing good can come from it. Funny thing is that he said after the first DF that that would never happen again.:HUH?:

- - - Updated - - -

Well, I don't know, but I think I'm fast losing confidence in your friend's ability to actually "get" things....
I hear ya, we only live about 3 houses apart and he said he was going to call me before he shot that release. I had told him if you shoot it before to stand real close to your target until you get the feel for it. I guess didn't figure that would mean there would be an arrow involved, I know I have told him before to never draw a bow without an arrow, nothing good can come from it. Funny thing is that he said after the first DF that that would never happen again.:HUH?:
 
O

Otis

Guest
is dry-firing as catastrophic as it is made out to be?
i have always heard it results in cracked limbs. what other things can be a result of the dryfire?
i was shooting my bow one day and a friend stopped by. he's about as opposite to being an outdoorsman as you can get. he was super-impressed by the bow so i let him hold it. before i knew it, he had drawn it back. i hadn't expected that, and as i was then telling him to NOT release it, he released it. i almost died, fully expecting my bow to be ruined. but there appeared to be no damage at all.
 
Messages
36,481
Likes
1,563
Location
6200 km Away.
Almost all bow manufacturers take a bow (or more) and dry fire it until it fails. This gives them a guideline (of sorts) so they are able to predict and/or advise prospective buyers as to the durability of their product(s).

One dry fire does not a broken bow make. Especially if that dry fire is only done once or maybe twice in the life of that bow.

Having said the above - it is always prudent, safe, and just plain good sense to have the bow checked after a dry fire.
 

Users who viewed this discussion (Total:0)

Top Bottom