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"Gentleman's" Tractors... aka Sub Compacts

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Bow Walker

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Anyone here run smaller tractors on a few acres or perhaps a bit of a homestead|?

I've just acquired a 2012 Kioti CS 2410. It has a front bucket, a 60" mower deck, a 3-point hitch, a mid-point p.t.o. and a rear p.t.o. I'll be taking possession of it in the middle of the month and plan on using it quite a bit. Firstly for snow removal on the driveway and of course mowing the lawn(s), but also using the bucket for general chores.

It's going to be a learning curve for me because I have never owned a tractor, let alone driven or worked with one. Tons of info on the internet about the Kioti specifically, and sub compact tractors in general. One site that looks to be a gold mine for information is this one https://asktractormike.com/ I've been viewing a lot of his videos and they all seem right to the point and easily understood.


I found a vid that suggests filling the back tires with some sort of fluid that would act as a ballast for the front loader. The need for ballast is pretty evident but the room to put it on a smaller tractor is a bit of a head-scratcher, hence the reason for filling the back tires with fluid. The fluids of choice seem to be calcium chloride (corrosive on the rims), windshield washer fluid, anti freeze, and something kind of new - beet juice. Yes, I said beet juice.

Seems that a by-product of processing sugar beets can be further processed and sold as a very good alternative for filling back tires on smaller tractors. Looks like this 'beet juice' has a lot going for it over any other fluid - it doesn't freeze until about -30 degrees, it is heavier than any other fluid currently in use, and it is relatively cheap at around .28 cents per gallon, plus it is non-corrosive to the rims of the wheel and the rubber of the tire.

Being a rookie at this I am open to advice, tips, hints, and how-to's from any reasonable source - experience is usually gained thru making mistakes, but I really don;t want to be making mistakes with what is essentially a piece of heavy machinery.

Let's talk. :Oh Yeah!:
 

Vic

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Grew up with tractors on the farm and later had an old Massey with a front end loader and blade on 5 acres in Aldergrove. Use with caution, watch inclines, don't overload and you should be fine. A straw hat and a blade of grass to chew on and you will be good to go. Don't imagine there is a power take off. If there is you have to be careful not to get any clothing caught on it as they can be killers.
 

Foxton Gundogs

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We have a JD 855 Personally I would not want anything smaller, but it's a fine line between to big and to small, a thin line between mobility and power. jd0.jpg
 

Walleye King

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Back in the day when I worked in a tire shop, we used calcium chloride. That was a day or two ago. It worked fine. It was also good for nicks and cuts on the hands as a bit of that liquid dried them up instantly. A tractor is like anything else, practice and get the feel for it. You will soon figure out what it's limits are as are yours.
 

Foxton Gundogs

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Back in the day when I worked in a tire shop, we used calcium chloride. That was a day or two ago. It worked fine. It was also good for nicks and cuts on the hands as a bit of that liquid dried them up instantly. A tractor is like anything else, practice and get the feel for it. You will soon figure out what it's limits are as are yours.
Don't get it on leather boots or gloves, Just sayin', I used to wrench on dust control trucks, learned the hard way bout that.
 

robert5

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Having been a HD mechanic part of my life and been around calcium filled tires on big compactors with huge tires
that would gain traction with the amount of Liguid placed in them.
My advice to you is forget it, your tire size is not big enough to make a difference. You machine is small and that is
fine, do not try and make it a more robust unit by doing this. Except what it is and have fun with it. Every time you try
and modify machinery you create an other problem.
Want stronger buy bigger!
Cheers, Bob
 
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Bow Walker

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Vic - it does have a p.yo. in the middle (powers the lawn mower deck) and on the rear end for all sorts of attachments - a snow blower immediately comes to mind.... but I hate looking over my shoulder all the time to use it while backing up, hence my intention of using the front bucket to both push and scrape the long driveway.

Jim - I leaned that JD has their own kind of quick-attach for anything that attaches to the front of your tractor. It won't take anything else but Deere attachments. Nice tractor though.... pretty lady on it too! Oh, and I'll not be using calcium chloride at all.

Mike - I've been watching a lot of safety videos to get a feel for what to do and how not to do things. One biggy (pardon the pun) is to not have the bucket too high when travelling - either loaded or unloaded, going down steeper grades, and other 'how-to' stuff.

Bob - Hmm, good advice. Using it within its limits does have merit....but I think the main reason for filling the tires it to aid in traction on muddy or snowy ground. One vid had a guy filling his cs2410 rear tires with window washer fluid and when he was done it added 935 lbs to the back end of the little thing. Since my front lawn has a decent slope to it I'm thinking that the weight in the back will help quite a bit.....I could be wrong tho. There's a whole lot of weight on the front end so mowing down a slope by driving forward just might get a bit tricky.

Here's a pic of the little beast.

Kioti cs2410.jpg
 

robert5

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Vic - it does have a p.yo. in the middle (powers the lawn mower deck) and on the rear end for all sorts of attachments - a snow blower immediately comes to mind.... but I hate looking over my shoulder all the time to use it while backing up, hence my intention of using the front bucket to both push and scrape the long driveway.

Jim - I leaned that JD has their own kind of quick-attach for anything that attaches to the front of your tractor. It won't take anything else but Deere attachments. Nice tractor though.... pretty lady on it too! Oh, and I'll not be using calcium chloride at all.

Mike - I've been watching a lot of safety videos to get a feel for what to do and how not to do things. One biggy (pardon the pun) is to not have the bucket too high when travelling - either loaded or unloaded, going down steeper grades, and other 'how-to' stuff.

Bob - Hmm, good advice. Using it within its limits does have merit....but I think the main reason for filling the tires it to aid in traction on muddy or snowy ground. One vid had a guy filling his cs2410 rear tires with window washer fluid and when he was done it added 935 lbs to the back end of the little thing. Since my front lawn has a decent slope to it I'm thinking that the weight in the back will help quite a bit.....I could be wrong tho. There's a whole lot of weight on the front end so mowing down a slope by driving forward just might get a bit tricky.

Here's a pic of the little beast.

View attachment 20610
Those are small tires to be adding any fluid to. You might be able to find wheel weights that insert into the rim,
They are cast metal and fill the the rim cavity. Another option is to have steel plates cut and mount on the rear
of the tractor, little fabrication involved. Or you could just sit me on it as I have pretty good ballast. lol
 

Foxton Gundogs

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Chains, those turf tires wont go anyplace in the snow, or see if the dealer will swap them out for traction tires. JMO
 

robert5

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The first picture gives you an idea how to attach a frame on the rear to accept steel plate.
Second picture is actual wheel weights for your unit.
I agree, you will require chains for plowing.image.pngimage.pngimage.png
 

Bow Walker

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For a "no-cost" "low-cost" option, filling those small tires will provide me with all the ballast weight that I should ever need/require. As has been mentioned - it is a small machine and should be used accordingly. I will keep on the lookout for bolt-on ballast weights for the back wheels though. They'd be a hellova lot easier option that filling the tires.

I am not sure what kind of tires are actually on the machine until I get to see it again in a couple of weeks. First time I saw it I didn't pay a whole lot of attention to details..... :Black Eye:
 

Foxton Gundogs

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My old Case when I was up north was 2wd I made a Bracket out of angle iron and plate(all from the scrap pile. Looked kind of like the pix R5 posted. I made it to fit a large milk"wire" crate and I would just fill it with bricks and bungie it down. worked like a charm and cos nothing except a few bolts and some 032 wire.
 

Bow Walker

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I've looked up wheel weights for sub compact tractors and the run from 750 to 900 pounds - depending on how many a person installs on each wheel.

The price? Start at a Grand and keep climbing - and that's per wheel...... :Really Mad:
 

Bow Walker

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One of the more useful attachements looks to be this thing - called a "box blade". Even it starts at $940 + taxes..... (the taxes here are a whopping 15%).
PG111935.jpg

3-Point Tractor Attachment Box Blades are designed for Landscaping, Gravel Work, Driveways, Light Construction and Leveling Applications.

3-Point Tractor Attachment Box Blades provide durable boxed ends that keep the material being worked in place. Features 3 depth adjustments on ripping shanks with heat treated cutting edges. Attachments include front and rear reversible cutting edges, long-lasting UV resistant powder coat finish, and a heavy 4" tool bar that holds up during deepest penetration. Category 1 quick hitch compatibly. Available styles are Heavy Duty and Sub Compact. Blade type is Heat Treated Cutting Edge. Shank quantities are 4, 5, and 6. 1 Year Limited Warranty.
 

Foxton Gundogs

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I have the same rock box only with 3 rippers, works well. As for forks, I use my hay forks for pallets amd other such thngs.
 

robert5

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It's a whole new and different world that is opening up for me - starting in a couple of weeks.... :Yee Ha:
A couple of things to remember, it has a ROPS so please use your seat belt. Read the owners manual and you
Will find this is a hydro static unit and the proper way to operate it is to go to full throttle when traveling and ajust the propel lever for speed, not like a car where you use the throttle to very speed as well all implements are rated to work at what is called high idle.
 

Bow Walker

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Yup! For sure. :Oh Yeah!:

Those Roll Over Protection Structures (gawd - i hate acronyms!:mad:) are there for a good reason - although you need to be aware of the height and the clearance around trees and/or door openings.

Actually - my Cub Cadet lawn tractor is controlled in much the same way. I adjust the throttle to control the motor revs/speed and that allows the blades to cut fast and efficient. The vehicle speed is controlled by a peddle that advances a belt up or down on a cone shaped rotating piece......all under cover of course.

I have seen in the tractor training videos that they want you to keep the revs high on a diesel engine and operate the attachments within a specified range - which is usually marked on the tachometer.
 

Bow Walker

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Weight on the arse end of a tractor 'usually' means that the operator is doing something outside the capacity(s) of the piece of equipment in question....usually - but not always.

My tractor just has turf-tread tires on the back so I'm thinking that trying to keep the driveway clear this winter might be a tad easier with some weight towards the rear end of the machine... I'll be looking at replacing those tires with ones that have the industrial tread on them - as soon as the budget allows. In the mean time........
 

Big Lew

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We had several sizes of tractors on our farm from glorified garden tractors to big Case tractors.
None were 4 wheel drive. My dad fabricated chains for them all, placing a cross link between
each store bought one. He didn't need extra weight as he found that he was asking the units to
do more than they were designed to do if he put them on, both wheel weights and attached solid
metal bars. Just the doubled cross link chains were heavy enough to be called wheel weights though.
 

Bow Walker

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Yup - that's the listed size of the little blighters.... although I'm not too sure what the last "12" means. I understand the 26x12 but after that I'm in the dark. Could it mean the width of the tires?
 
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