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Had a chortle today...

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Big Lew

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Got a message on my iphone just now from Telus encouraging me to get with the times
and buy their package allowing monitoring and tracking of my vehicle's performance etc..
I responded as such....No thanks, I've done just fine for 57 years and 1.5+ million miles
and I'm very confident I can continue doing well for the next 5-15 years I'm alive without
all that baloney. I'll put my driving record, both private and commercial up against your's
any day.
I'm waiting for their response....
 

Foxton Gundogs

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They can already do that Jim. A buddy of mine flopped a Super Train on railway corner just above the Cottonwood hill. The cops accessed the Trucks computer and found there was no excess speed involved. Plug into most vehicle's computer and they know everything that occurred prior to the accident including speed, braking etc. Big Brother has been watching for a long time.
 

Big Lew

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They can already do that Jim. A buddy of mine flopped a Super Train on railway corner just above the Cottonwood hill. The cops accessed the Trucks computer and found there was no excess speed involved. Plug into most vehicle's computer and they know everything that occurred prior to the accident including speed, braking etc. Big Brother has been watching for a long time.
Yes, even before I retired in 2011 our trucks had computerized records that could be called upon to tell
exactly how the truck and engine were driven...accurate enough to map out what streets it used.
Even back at least 45 years ago most of trucks had what were called 'stool pigeons'. They were basically
a big clock-like device that recorded speed, engine rpm and time on a paper graft. When scrutinized
with a magnifying glass or sent to a machine that was designed to read them it was possible to tell exactly
how the truck was driven, including shifting patterns, operating either within recommended rpm perimeters,
or if the driver was lugging the engine, coasting along out of gear, braking too hard, and what gear was being
used. Their disadvantage was in relying on the driver to put in a card before each shift. Some of our poor
drivers would gerrymander with them until they broke so the company couldn't tell how poorly they drove,
if they were going well out of their route, and even if they were 'hiding somewhere' to get more overtime.
 

Bow Walker

RUFF N TUMBLE "LEGEND" IN MY OWN MIND.
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I remember those paper graph card-wheels Dave - they were in all the highway rigs at CP Transport when I was driving. My job was referred to as "City Tractor" which means I was just under the line for being paid by mileage.

I drove from Nanaimo to Duncan or Nanaimo to Qualicum, and anything in between that required a tractor-trailer. I mostly hauled wooden cants out of Ladysmith back to Nanaimo for loading onto the nightly CP Ferry between Nanaimo and Burrard inlet (Vancouver).
 

Big Lew

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When I first started driving concrete trucks with the graph cards, the company had a contest
to see who could turn in the best examples of properly driven trucks every week. All the trucks
had 5 and 4 transmissions at the time. We had a few excellent drivers that were very good and
comfortable shifting those transmissions and they took me under their wings to show me how.
A couple of them used to drive logging trucks and by using one arm through the steering wheel,
could shift both sticks at once faster then quick silver. Of course this wasn't allowed on public roads
so I practiced and practiced doing the same thing with just my right hand until my graph was solid
black within the motor operating range. Before long I was winning the weekly contest most of the time.
The truck foreman came out from Vancouver to test and observe my driving, and he soon said that I was
doing it wrong. I pulled over and politely asked him to demonstrate how I should be doing it...he couldn't
without grinding gears so conceded that I had it down pat and to keep doing what I was doing. That's when
I became interested in becoming a driving instructor and later a tester as well as an accident investigator
for the company.
 

Bow Walker

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I was taught that arm-thru-the-steering-wheel trick too.

It was about the only way to shift on an uphill incline and still maintain momentum.
 

Foxton Gundogs

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twin sticks were a art. My first truck had them and they continued to walk through my trucking life every now and again. Anyone who had a feel for them got pretty good, straight sticking them when appropriate 2 handed shifts etc. I probably couldn't shift a twin sticker anymore but was pretty damn fair at one time. That was trucking in the raw lol
 

Bow Walker

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Yeah, I doubt that I still retain the knack for it..... probably grind the transmission smooth if I tried it these days.

My left leg was always stronger than my right - and my left boot got wore out quicker too, from working the clutch so much :Doh!:
 

Big Lew

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Yeah, I doubt that I still retain the knack for it..... probably grind the transmission smooth if I tried it these days.

My left leg was always stronger than my right - and my left boot got wore out quicker too, from working the clutch so much :Doh!:
Clutch? Oh that thingy on the floor that you had to push in when you wanted to stop on an uphill.

I once drove a 5 and 4 truck all day back and forth with a frozen clutch to a big jobsite that had a concrete pump.
There is enough slack in the mechanics of a 5 and 4 that it can be put in 1st main gear (or reverse) and
then slapped all the way into 1st gear in the auxiliary before everything tightens up. As long as the transmission is
slipped out of gear before having to stop, the truck can be driven all day without the use of a clutch.
Not so with a single transmission such as a 13 spd without real risk of damage.
 

Bow Walker

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Sometimes I drove the 2-sticks without using the clutch - it was a matter of matching revs when gearing up or down. Worked quite well on roads that were pretty much level but it did not on steeper grades... :Doh!:

Our shop supervisor/foreman (Harold Bohardt) got VERY upset if he ever heard about, or caught you at that practice. :Yikes!:
 

Big Lew

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Sometimes I drove the 2-sticks without using the clutch - it was a matter of matching revs when gearing up or down. Worked quite well on roads that were pretty much level but it did not on steeper grades... :Doh!:

Our shop supervisor/foreman (Harold Bohardt) got VERY upset if he ever heard about, or caught you at that practice. :Yikes!:
In order to pass a test you must be able to show that you can shift while using the clutch.
Many drivers, especially in town or city environments where they have to constantly shift,
seldom use a clutch, and when having to go for a test, have to practice using one beforehand.
As for shifting gears without a clutch on hilly roads, the trick is timing and not to let yourself get
behind on the shifts, but rather to skip a gear or two and wait the millisecond or two for everything
to line up. Done right it should be like using an automatic transmission...maybe even smoother.
In all the years, and our company having hundreds of trucks during that time, transmission and
clutch damage was extremely low compared to the trucks driven by drivers always using the clutch.
We had one such driver fry a clutch in a brand new truck because he continually slipped it during the
latter part of his shifting while under full power.
 
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