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interesting ancestors

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sealevel

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might be fun ...do you have an interesting family member that you would have liked to have met and talked to . ..i will start it

my great grandfather came from Barbados to fight for the north in the US civil war..unfortunately i didn`t even get to meat my grandmother she died the year before i was born . now i sure wish i could chat with him .
 

Big Lew

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My great grandfather and great grandmother, James and Fanny Rolley.
In 1888 James and Fanny Rolley, who Rolley lake was named after, settled on the lake’s shores
and lived there for ten years. Everything for their remote living was carried up there via a rough
and muddy trail from the Fraser river. The isolation became too much for Fanny and their
2 children, Ruth and Fred, because James was away for long periods of time working for the Railroad.
Consequently, they moved down to another homestead on the north side of River Road that straddled
Rolley Creek and reached Whonnock Creek. Fred and Ruth inherited it when their parents died.
 

Foxton Gundogs

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Mu Great, Great Uncle on my Dad's Mom's side Was From Ireland and was what were called Wild Geese, basically mercenaries he fought in India and came to Canada to fight in the rebellions with his "company". They were promised X amount of money per month per man. When time came to collect their pay 6 months in( apparently although they were paid by the month the could only collect after 6 months of service) their pay was almost nothing. the explanation was deductions for food, board, uniforms and ammo.
Well they had enough to buy some cheap whisky and get drunk. A dozen Pi$$ed off drunk Irishmen, what could go wrong here, they decided they would get their pay one way or the other and stole a wagon load of guns to take to the USA and sell. They made camp before crossing the border and my Uncle and his mate went to get camp meat. When they returned from an unsuccessful hunt they topped a rise above camp only to see their cohorts surrounded by red coats. as they watched from hiding their friends were lined up and shot on the spot. The two of them snuck off and made for BC and lost themselves in the gold fields. Uncle went on to live a long and uneventful life working as a blacksmith in a number of towns including some of the BX stage stops and fathering 12 kids(Irish Catholic you see). His stolen 577 Snyder Enfield with all the stampings hangs above our fireplace today.
 

Big Lew

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I would like to be able to have a few days with another ancestor, Sir Cecil Hertslet, British Concul-General.
Career
Entered Foreign Office, 1868. Assistant in Treaty Department, 1888. His (or Her) Majesty Consul-General for the Departments of the Seine Inf£rieure, Calvados, the Eure, and theOrne, 1896-1903.
Jubilee Medal, 1897; Doyen of the Consular body at Havre, 1899. British Juror, Photographic Class, Paris Exhibition, 1900. His (or Her) Majesty Consul-General for Belgium, 1903.
British Representative on the Superior Jury, Liege Exhibition, 1905. President of Photographic Convention of United Kingdom, Brussels meeting, 1908. Member of the Royal Commission for the Brussels Exhibition 1910, and the Turin and Rome Exhibitions 1911.
British Delegate on the International Association of Navigation Congresses, and British representative on the permanent bureau of the Association, 1909. British representative on the Superior Jury, Brussels Exhibition, 1910. Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society. His (or Her) Majesty Consul-General for Belgium....I'll bet if you could get by his British snobbery, he would have one heck of a lot of tales to tell.
 

Foxton Gundogs

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Going back to the "Old Country" My Mom's Mom always said we came from Royalty. My Mom got into the genealogy thing and started to do research. What she found is back in the 1400 there was a war between 2 factions, the Lancasters( us ) and the Yorks. when the Lancasters took over the throne they installed a couple of Kings that only lasted a short time till Richard the 3rd usurped the throne from his Nephew. Richard was the politician while his illegitimate 1/2 brother was the warrior. When Richard ascended the throne he killed the 2 young Princes(Richard and Edward) and banished his 1/2 brother(afraid of his fighting skills) who apparently drank and wenched far to much, to the Romney Marsh area in the south of England. There he set up an inn, gambling and whore house. He became a smuggler bring in French liquor and would knock patrons over the head and sell them into military service. My mother abruptly ceased her search of the family tree when she discovered this.
 
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my great,great,great grandfather EDWARD TOBIAS PURCELL ,born at TYMOGUE Castle Ireland,was master and commander of a 2 deck,80 cannon British Navy ship, H.M.S.SUPERB. Leeward islands,stationed in the West Indies and finally in the MEDITERRIAN where he was commissioned as REAR ADMIRAL.....
Holdings in the INDIAN TRAMWAY Co, and other (less honorable) holdings.
my dad was K.TOBIAS PURCELL, I AM GLENN EDWARD, brother is r.TOBIAS. Seems the 2 first names have followed us thru history.....
last survivor of Capt.BLYE'S Ship H.M.S. BOUNTY was their shipwright ,also a PURCELL.... BROTHER SAYS WE ARE RELATED......I'D LIKE TO THINK SO but I DOUBT IT.............
 
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sealevel

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my dads oldest aunt was born a slave . said part for me is my dad and his sisters ( all gone ) were ashamed of it and would never admit that some of our ancestors were black .
my one cousin was tracing all our genealogy stuff but she pasted away . maybe someone else will start doing it..just not me i have to many guns to fix
 

gunseller

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Our history is what makes us who we are. I have other ansterors that were forced to be on the trail of tears, Cherokees. It would be nice to talk to them and the ones before them to know what it was like to live in Noeth America 2, 3 or 500 years age or even before that.
Steve
 

Big Lew

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Same with the Indigenous peoples living along the west coast.
Because food was relatively easy to get, they had time for elaborate community structure.
One thing that remains constant though in most of the world's societies is how war and
conflict was and is a huge part of their lives. It's almost as if it's a game...deadly rivals hold
truces in order to trade goods etc, and then it's back to raiding, killing, and obtaining slaves.
 

Foxton Gundogs

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My Lala (Great Grandmother on my Dad's Dad's side)was 1/2 Northern Cheyenne Her people fled to Canada with Sitting Bull but returned to the Montana Territory after Dull Knife led his remaining people to the north and eventually settled near Miles City. I was to young to remember much about her but would love the chance to talk with Lala now.
 

KH4

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I don't know much about my ancestors specifically, but I did do family tree research on my father's a side a few years back. I'm second gen Canadian and I was able to trace my tree back to 1690 in the Netherlands. It was somewhat easy as they pretty much lived in the same place for 100s of years.

When I eventually travel there I would like to try to visit some churches and see if I can find records going back later.
 

Finaddict

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My great grandfather on my father's side who fought in the British army in the Boer wars in S. Africa and then as a captain in WW1. Several medals including conspicuous bravery.

Also my great great great great uncle on my mother's side who was a British loyalist during the American Independence war. Served as a Colonel for the British and was rewarded with land in Ontario as a result.
 
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I learned,just last week,that many FIRST NATIONS people and the CHINESE got along VERY WELL, back in the ''beginning''each respecting each others cultures and ways of life....many natives having Chinese last names and the same with Chinese having ''native ''names and the ''given to natives'' white names........the ''doc'' had a native lady ,in Vancouver,originally from lilooet,who was taken for 8 or 10 years to china.....she ''ran away'' somehow made it back to Vancouver where she only spoke mandarin.....never is one too old to learn...
 

olympia

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Foxton, you win the prize for the "most interesting family history" so far. Loved every word of your recounts. I don't have much to add...my dad's side were mostly military men and mom's side were "mutineers" against British rule.
 
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sealevel

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my wifes great grandfather was a thornton of thornton shipping line in jolly old england . air t
























I learned,just last week,that many FIRST NATIONS people and the CHINESE got along VERY WELL, back in the ''beginning''each respecting each others cultures and ways of life....many natives having Chinese last names and the same with Chinese having ''native ''names and the ''given to natives'' white names........the ''doc'' had a native lady ,in Vancouver,originally from lilooet,who was taken for 8 or 10 years to china.....she ''ran away'' somehow made it back to Vancouver where she only spoke mandarin.....never is one too old to learn...
i would say they got along really well . lots of natives along the cpr tracks look chinese
 

BC30cal

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sealevel;
Top of the frosty morning to you sir, I hope the week treated you well and this finds you warm and dry on this second Saturday in December.

Thanks for the thread, I appreciate the respondents sharing their heritage with us.

As one poster said, our ancestral movements are much affected by wars and conflict.

I don't really know too much about my personal heritage other than to say that both my grandfathers were refugees when they came to Canada in the early 1900's.

On Dad's side, his father and mother came from Romania but were from a German speaking colony that had been established in the 1700's. He came with his brother in law and sister. The brother in law was AWOL from the Romanian Army and as I understand it would have been shot if caught within the boundaries of the Romanian territory at the time. This was 1908 or so I believe.

I don't know much else about Dad's side other than we have more than our share of alcoholics apparently.

On Mom's side, her father was smuggled out of Russia under a load of hay by Jewish farmers. He spoke German - High German actually and was quite well educated - but was drafted by the Czar's army and didn't want to go shoot his neighbors so he paid to be smuggled out. This was in 1911.

We always thought they were German, but when our youngest was doing a bit of a search on the family name it appears they were likely Ashkenazi Jews.

Canada was actually quite anti Semitic back then so both of the grandfathers upon landing in Montreal declared themselves to be Catholic, though neither was any more Catholic than the Pope's cat.....

Both of them went into agriculture, Dad's family in Saskatchewan and Mom's in southern Alberta and both did really quite well for their families.

The other thing I recall about both families was that they tried really, really hard to become Canadian in all ways. Dad's father volunteered for the Canadian Army in WWI but was told to go back farming as they needed the food he grew. That and maybe his German name didn't suit them, I can't say.

Neither ever talked about the "old country" to me ever and as far as I know never went back or wanted to for that matter.

Anyway sir, thanks for the thread and again to those who've responded.

All the best to you all in the upcoming Christmas Season.

Dwayne
 

dakoda62

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My father and grandmother spent considerable time researching our family history, they proved to the early 1600's, seems all our family were loyal to the crown during the american revolution. (United Empire Loyalist's) Subsequently removed from the states and ended up in the bay of Quinte Ont. From there to Eastern Townships of Quebec slowly moving West. Farmers, miners and ranchers.
 

Foxton Gundogs

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I learned,just last week,that many FIRST NATIONS people and the CHINESE got along VERY WELL, back in the ''beginning''each respecting each others cultures and ways of life....many natives having Chinese last names and the same with Chinese having ''native ''names and the ''given to natives'' white names........the ''doc'' had a native lady ,in Vancouver,originally from lilooet,who was taken for 8 or 10 years to china.....she ''ran away'' somehow made it back to Vancouver where she only spoke mandarin.....never is one too old to learn...
Interesting read along this line

Kanaka Heritage Lives on in BC
Posted by Daniel on Jun 8, 2011 - 6 comments
Sorry about that. A technical glitch knocked me offline for a few days. But I'm back, and sorry to read last week about the death of former provincial finance minister, and mayor of Saanich, Mel Couvelier.
Of the accounts of his career that I read, there was no mention of one of the most remarkable ways that Mr. Couvelier was connected to the history of the province: he was descended from Kanakas.
Kanakas were Hawaiians (the word means "human being" in Polynesian) who came to BC in the nineteenth century to work for the Hudson's Bay Company in the fur trade. Some married local women and settled here instead of retiring back to Hawaii. In Vancouver, for instance, there was a small community known as Kanaka Ranch down in Coal Harbour at the entrance to Stanley Park.
As historian Jean Barman relates in her book Maria Mahoi of the Islands (New Star Books), Mr. Couvelier was the great-grandson of Maria Mahoi, a remarkable woman who was herself the daughter of a Kanaka man and a First Nations woman. She was born in 1855, long before BC became a province, and lived until 1936. She raised a large family, first on all on Saltspring Island and then on Russell Island, a small island in Fulford Harbour that is now part of the Gulf Islands National Park.
As Kanakas intermarried and merged with the local community they tended to lose their distinctive ethnic identity but there are still many British Columbians who proudly trace their ancestry back to the Hawaiian pioneers and Mel Couvelier was one of them.
If you want to learn more about the Kanakas in Vancouver, check out another book by Jean Barman, Stanley Park's Secret: The Forgotten Families of Whoi Whoi, Kanaka Ranch and Brockton Point (Harbour Publishing).

The Kanakas
The Hawaiian Islands are located in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, about halfway between North America and the Orient. Ships carrying furs and other goods from the Pacific coast to China stopped at these islands to take on supplies and do some trading. In those days they were called the Sandwich Islands.
The Native people of the islands were good sailors. Some of them signed on as crew members of the trading ships. In this way they ended up in British Columbia, where they were known as Kanakas. (Kanaka is a word from the Pacific islands meaning “human being.”)
Hawaiians helped to build Fort Langley and Fort Victoria. It was not unusual to find one or two working at any of the trading posts in New Caledonia. Most were men. Some of them married Aboriginal women and settled down to live in British Columbia permanently.
Many people living in British Columbia today can trace their ancestry back to the original settlers from Hawaii.
 
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sealevel

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my dads family has been in north america since the early 17 hundreds . but my grandparents on my moms side both came to canada about 1905 . my gramma came from Prussia where all her family were kill in a religious cleansing . she road the minto from arrowhead to burton to work as a house keeper in the mininite colony then at burton . she met and married my grandfather in armstrong . from there to they went to prince goerge by wagon in about 1915 . i have no idea how long that took . they later took the train to saskatoon . my mom is 95 and she remmebers the wagon trip from saskatoon to flat valley took about 20 days . ...then back to armstrong . in 1939
 

olympia

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I learned,just last week,that many FIRST NATIONS people and the CHINESE got along VERY WELL, back in the ''beginning''each respecting each others cultures and ways of life....many natives having Chinese last names and the same with Chinese having ''native ''names and the ''given to natives'' white names........the ''doc'' had a native lady ,in Vancouver,originally from lilooet,who was taken for 8 or 10 years to china.....she ''ran away'' somehow made it back to Vancouver where she only spoke mandarin.....never is one too old to learn...

Yeah the Chinese and natives in Lytton to Boston bar area lived together and intermarried back in the day. I read it on the net, it was a very interesting article.
 
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we still have kin living in south INDIA........sure wish i knew what i am supposed to be??????
hell,on SAINT PATRICKS DAY, 1/3 of MEXICANS are IRISH !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That's another great story...
 

Bow Walker

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Anyone who has an affinity for green beer or Irish Whiskey all of a sudden finds Irish ancestors on St. Paddy's Day...... :Heh, heh, heh:



I have been doing ancestry research for a couple-three years now. I've managed to trace our line back to the early 1300's and have found a few "relations" along the way that were a bit on the shady side of the fence.

One was put on trial for murder in 1842. Another was hung as a witch during the craziness of the Salem Witch Hunt years.
 

Big Lew

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I'm sure that if a person were to dig back far enough (for some not that far at all, lol)
they would find some scoundrels...our family tree had some, including high ranking Nazis.
 

gunseller

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I had an uncle.that was on a first name bases with the Columbian drug cartel members. He ended up doing 5 years in Califorina prison. I have 2 brothers in law, one I would kill for the other I could kill and sleep well ar night. As the old saying goes you can pick your friends not you relitives.
Steve
 

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