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Kids miss out on so many neat things now-a-days...

Big Lew

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When I was a boy we didn't have our faces glued to a electronic device, we made our
own fun without nosy and over protective adults spoiling it. As an example, how many
older people here made their own boomerangs and slingshots? How many enjoyed spirited
'spear' fights out of tall fern stalks? How many made their own fishing rods out of thin hazelnut
suckers and a length of string with a bent nail or safety pin for a hook? Few kids had new bikes.
They made old ones work by scrounging parts and fixing stuff themselves. Back then kids could be
very ingenious with making things work without having to 'google' it...just saying...
 

Foxton Gundogs

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Jan. 13 1956. I counted out my chore Xmas and BD money wrote a nice letter on lined paper with a pencil and mailed it off with dollars bills $0.50 pieces, remember those?, and other misc change. 10 days later I received a package from Sears. A shiney new Cooey single shot 22. Try that today lol. We built rafts to get out to the cod bank where the big lings hung out. Built forked fishing spears out of forked maple branches and would cook out catch over an outdoor fire started with our trusty magnifying glasses. We were maybe 8, shot grouse and rabbits and roasted them in the old fireplace in a hand loggers cabin that was 1/2 caved in but with lots of room for 8 yr old to play sleep and eat in. I feel sorry for today's kids.
 

Big Lew

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Jan. 13 1956. I counted out my chore Xmas and BD money wrote a nice letter on lined paper with a pencil and mailed it off with dollars bills $0.50 pieces, remember those?, and other misc change. 10 days later I received a package from Sears. A shiney new Cooey single shot 22. Try that today lol
When I had a paper route between ages 10 and 12, (1956-58) I collected Orange Crush bottle caps, saved up $2,
and mailed it in to receive a small Kodak box camera which I used for years.
 

Big Lew

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And while I'm at it...what's up with the bicycles both boys and girls have today?
Everything is image to them. They can't possibly get caught riding an efficient and comfortable
bike because it's not cool. I see them going by my place either standing up and peddling for
a short while and then coasting, or they're sitting really low and hitting their chin with their knees
as they try to peddle in that awkward position...but, hey, I'm cool!
 

NAHMINT II

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HOW REFRESHING!!!!!!!!! 8-12 yr olds ,responsible enough to go bush IF we were lucky ,with a whole new box(50)
rounds of C.I.L. .22Long-Whizz bangs. mostly we had a pocket of mixed .22short and longs of standard and high vel. rounds. hardly ever bought LONG RIFLE rounds as they cost more.... my brother and i had an old 14 ft Lapstreak DORE (down east type).We rowed everywhere on LakeST.Louis, between the OTTAWA and ST.LAWRENCE river...camped on a couple little islands or the long BREAK WATER that was dredged for the OKA Sand and gravel barges.
we usually had a big bottle of KIK Cola, a cheap eastern version of CocaCola....5cents for a quart size.bottle .
couple sandwiches and a 15 cent bag of mixed candies......we ate lots of perch,sunfish,walleye.
we had pen knifes and 4-6'' fixed blade knives,matches,a blanket each and an oil coal oil lantern....adventure started on friday late afternoon and home ,about 3pm sunday......... today,18yr olds. have to report in every couple hours on cellphones...... wonder what caused the ''big change''.
 

Big Lew

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When my school buddy and I at age 14 rode our bicycles up the Fraser canyon from the valley
to Cache Creek (where my buddy's new bike broke down) and then walked back to Ashcroft to
catch the train back to Mission we had no hassles what-so-ever from adults. We were shocked
to learn later that underage teens couldn't do that sort of thing in the States without being reported
and having the police pick them up. I don't think kids that age would even be adventurous enough
to try that today, especially with the basic equipment we used back then.
 

robert5

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Grew up in Richmond in the 50's, lot's of freedom. We would be gone all day either on our bikes or on the big rafts
we made to explor all the ditches in Richmond. With our home made bows & arrows we would try and shoot the
government geese out of the air (seagulls) never did hit one, apparently they can dodge arrows pretty good.
It was a time of freedom for us young guys and it bestowed confidence and the ability to think for ourself on us.
 

Redneck

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And while I'm at it...what's up with the bicycles both boys and girls have today?
Everything is image to them. They can't possibly get caught riding an efficient and comfortable
bike because it's not cool. I see them going by my place either standing up and peddling for
a short while and then coasting, or they're sitting really low and hitting their chin with their knees
as they try to peddle in that awkward position...but, hey, I'm cool!
Those bikes are for dirt jumping. A game I played a lot before I got my driver's license. The low sloping top tube and low seat height, combined with a slack head angle makes them very forgiving when landing jumps, especially if you don't nail it perfectly.


Sorry to say, this is not a case of kids chasing an image, it's a case of an observer not understanding what he's observing.




As for kids these days...I see plenty of young teens out riding dirtbikes or mountain bikes, kids fishing, etc.

I was born in '86, and spent a lot of time with one or two friends biking somewhere to go fish, or just explore.
I have a 2 year old son now, and we, as well as the majority of our friends with kids, allow them a lot of freedom to go out and fall down and explore their world.
I don't think having the lifeline that is a cell phone is so bad. Comparatively, I see and hear recommendations for guys hunting solo to bring an in reach or spot device. We're adults, well versed in the woods, yet people still say it's a good idea to have a way to call for help if you have an issue. For example, a fall, a bad cut, or a stroke. Why is it not a good idea for an 8 year old, who may know very well how to ride a bike and bait a hook, but can still crash and break his arm, to have a way to call for help?

We certainly need to find a balance, but this tech is new. There are always hiccups adopting new technologies. Humans are adaptable creatures, we'll figure it out.
 
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Big Lew

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Those bikes are for dirt jumping. A game I played a lot before I got my driver's license. The low sloping top tube and low seat height, combined with a slack head angle makes them very forgiving when landing jumps, especially if you don't nail it perfectly.


Sorry to say, this is not a case of kids chasing an image, it's a case of an observer not understanding what he's observing.




As for kids these days...I see plenty of young teens out riding dirtbikes or mountain bikes, kids fishing, etc.

I was born in '86, and spent a lot of time with one or two friends biking somewhere to go fish, or just explore.
I have a 2 year old son now, and we, as well as the majority of our friends with kids, allow them a lot of freedom to go out and fall down and explore their world.
I don't think having the lifeline that is a cell phone is so bad. Comparatively, I see and hear recommendations for guys hunting solo to bring an in reach or spot device. We're adults, well versed in the woods, yet people still say it's a good idea to have a way to call for help if you have an issue. For example, a fall, a bad cut, or a stroke. Why is it not a good idea for an 8 year old, who may know very well how to ride a bike and bait a hook, but can still crash and break his arm, to have a way to call for help?

We certainly need to find a balance, but this tech is new. There are always hiccups adopting new technologies. Humans are adaptable creatures, we'll figure it out.
Having communication is a good thing. Allowing yourself to get completely preoccupied within them at the expense of
normal physical exercises, sports, or enjoying "the freedom to go out and fall down and explore their world" is what I'm
referring to.
I know what the bikes are designed for, but very few of the kids I see riding them past my place ever use them for their intention.
I guess it's the same as city adults having to buy suvs...it's an image rather than having something for what it's intended.
We have a skateboard-dirtbike track near my place and it's very entertaining to watch the kids do their moves. Some are very
good at it, same with the boards.
 

NAHMINT II

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Those bikes are for dirt jumping. A game I played a lot before I got my driver's license. The low sloping top tube and low seat height, combined with a slack head angle makes them very forgiving when landing jumps, especially if you don't nail it perfectly.


Sorry to say, this is not a case of kids chasing an image, it's a case of an observer not understanding what he's observing.




As for kids these days...I see plenty of young teens out riding dirtbikes or mountain bikes, kids fishing, etc.

I was born in '86, and spent a lot of time with one or two friends biking somewhere to go fish, or just explore.
I have a 2 year old son now, and we, as well as the majority of our friends with kids, allow them a lot of freedom to go out and fall down and explore their world.
I don't think having the lifeline that is a cell phone is so bad. Comparatively, I see and hear recommendations for guys hunting solo to bring an in reach or spot device. We're adults, well versed in the woods, yet people still say it's a good idea to have a way to call for help if you have an issue. For example, a fall, a bad cut, or a stroke. Why is it not a good idea for an 8 year old, who may know very well how to ride a bike and bait a hook, but can still crash and break his arm, to have a way to call for help?

We certainly need to find a balance, but this tech is new. There are always hiccups adopting new technologies. Humans are adaptable creatures, we'll figure it out.
You bring up some good points ,Seen thru a young man's eyes.......back in the 50s and early 60s, we made do with what we had....closest to a cell phone were smoke signals.......heck,many of us grew up without electricity.......
 

Big Lew

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You bring up some good points ,Seen thru a young man's eyes.......back in the 50s and early 60s, we made do with what we had....closest to a cell phone were smoke signals.......heck,many of us grew up without electricity.......
"..closest to a cell phone were smoke signals.." My brothers, friends, and I used to send smoke signals from different
places on my dad's bush farm. We used Morse Code as best we could because we had no idea what 'code' the original
users of smoke signals had. It was very time consuming, choking, and dirty work.
 

NAHMINT II

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good evening DAVE,
as for smoke signals, on the big lake, from our boat launch area, at the west end by the big swamp, we would watch for ''smoke'' on the break water,a mile away or down the far east end on several islands....at a prearranged time, 9 a.m, noon or late afternoon, if some of the guys were camping there,they would build a big shore fire,then hit it with wet sea weed... we then knew where they were at.....best we could do. I do not have one,But,like REDNECK points out, some kids have parents that show them the joys of the outdoors......as for c-phones, great for ''calling in'' these days.....I don't have one, no reception where i go anyways........wife gives me hers when i go out....makes her feel better.
 

Big Lew

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good evening DAVE,
as for smoke signals, on the big lake, from our boat launch area, at the west end by the big swamp, we would watch for ''smoke'' on the break water,a mile away or down the far east end on several islands....at a prearranged time, 9 a.m, noon or late afternoon, if some of the guys were camping there,they would build a big shore fire,then hit it with wet sea weed... we then knew where they were at.....best we could do. I do not have one,But,like REDNECK points out, some kids have parents that show them the joys of the outdoors......as for c-phones, great for ''calling in'' these days.....I don't have one, no reception where i go anyways........wife gives me hers when i go out....makes her feel better.
For quite a few years during the late 60's and into the late 70's I would camp in the fall off the east end of White Lake
on the road to Gang Ranch. It was in a beautiful glade hidden from the lake and road. I would build a very smoky fire
as soon as I had my tent and camp set up to signal the local cowboys droving cattle through the valley that I was there.
They knew it was me and would ride over for a visit, coffee, and some grub. This was a yearly event even when my kids
were little. My kids were in awe and thrilled to see and talk to real cowboys in real cowboy clothes, and on horses to boot!
 

olympia

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Growing up, any lumber that was "found" was used to build an "army base" in the woods and we wood sharpen branches and make spears to hunt with, never did harvest an animal but we tried lol. Making ramps for BMX jumps was another favorite pastime of mine. We would take ice cream bucket lids and cut star shapes out of them and use them as ninja stars and invented our own little war games and threw them at each other. Good times!!!
 

Biggyun68

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Grew up in the 70's and early 80's - Made forts - Learned how to fix my bike by 8 - got my first carpentry tools for Christmas when I was 10 - Got my first Mechanics tools when I was 12 and started making my own 10 speeds mostly pout of parts salvaged behind Dunbar Cycle when it was on Dunbar street. By 13 was taking week-end and longer bike trips to friends and camp grounds. Joined Sea Cadets to learn how to sail, shoot and operate a boat. As a result I had to take a bus to and from down town 2-3 times a week and learned how to be street smart. Returned to Scouting at 15 when rugby and cadets conflicted. Our Venturer/Rover troop planned many expeditions wining silver and gold Duke of Edinburgh awards along with BCFMC qualifications etc. We took to cars like we did bikes and learned on dirt loads and the old B lots at UBC how to drive before our parents got us our learners.
We still spent time in front of the TV watching movies from VHS or playing old video games but this was always our last choice not our first... the funny thing is we only had land lines yet we still found each other and hung out..... I think for the most par t having raised two kids to teenage-hood the difference is now that in the post mobile device days the herd had to adjust to the smart resourceful ones and now its the opposite where everyone adjusts to the lazy screen junkie level. Being an independent, resourceful outdoorsie kid is actually attacked.
 

NAHMINT II

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Biggyun68, evening to you.....
As kids ,growing up in the country, we were pretty ''bush-smart''.....but when i started taking the train or bus to MONTREAL or OTTAWA at 15,it was an eye opener...........met some ''city kids'' and learned real quick, STREET SMART was a whole different and unforgiving world !!!
was glad to get back to the country....
 

Bow Walker

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Much, much simpler time back then.... things were moving at a slower and (to me) more comfortable pace.

A guy had time to think things thru back then before getting into trouble. Did we? Not so much it appears. :Yee Ha:
 

Bow Walker

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Street Rules;
1. Do not show fear.
2. Be ready for a quick exit at any given moment.
3. If involved in any altercation - get in there quick, give it all you got, settle it with one or two well-placed "incentive inducements."
4. Never turn your back on an opponent.
5. Never trust anybody, never.
 

CanuckShooter

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I can remember the good old days, we even made our own bow and arrows. Amazing how deadly an arrow could be with a bottle cap pinched over the end. Slingshots were always fun. Tree forts, who else built those? And under ground bunkers...zip lining on the big cloths lines at the trailer court...sliced potato fried in lard...fishing the beaver ponds...walking the train tracks for miles and miles...raiding the gardens....
 

NAHMINT II

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another Brother from a different mother.....:Oh Yeah!: we used bottle caps ,not only for ARROW HEADS but nailed on a 2x4, about 15-14, made a great fish scaler !!! gave up on sling shots when the rubber,made from a truck tire inner tube slipped thru the copper wire attaching it and the dam thing hit me in the face...:Really Mad: we were garden raiders too .
 

Foxton Gundogs

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We fashioned arrow and spear points from can lids which btw were much thicker and more scucum than those of today.
 

olympia

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We were never good garden raiders at all...the old ladies who grew peas and had cherry trees in their yards guarded them with brooms and a deadly swing, I remember a mean old lady hitting a full grown German Sheperd with a shovel because it shyt in her yard while we were up in her tree, she knew our names and I got a "talking to" when i got home...I never raided another garden again after that.
 
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BCButcher

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I was a great apple thief as a child. There was a good orchard beside the road on the way to my fishing hole.
I try to encourage my son to be a hunter/gatherer as well. The big rule when toting a firearm in the bush by yourself...don’t let anyone see you.
 

Big Lew

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We cleared a 6 foot fence in a single bound when the back door opened and a 12 ga jacked in a round.....raiding gardens can come with a price.
Used to raid a couple of large cherry trees at the far end of a fellow's field.
He sicked his big dogs on us and they kept us in the tree all day before he called them back.
Same old man shot us with rock salt once out of his double barrelled 12 ga.
We stayed away after that in case he used real shot the next time.
 

NAHMINT II

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Good day DAVE,
Can u imagine someone shooting kids with ''rock salt today.....
they would be on national news/ trudeau would try to ban shotguns/ blair would lead all his ''storm-troopers'' on raids on all farms in western canada and ''lisa laflamme'' would be in tears as she discribed the ''horrific incident '' on cbc news......
OH KANADA ,WHERE DID YOU GO SOOOOO WRONG!!!
 

olympia

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Good day DAVE,
Can u imagine someone shooting kids with ''rock salt today.....
they would be on national news/ trudeau would try to ban shotguns/ blair would lead all his ''storm-troopers'' on raids on all farms in western canada and ''lisa laflamme'' would be in tears as she discribed the ''horrific incident '' on cbc news......
OH KANADA ,WHERE DID YOU GO SOOOOO WRONG!!!
Or they would ban cherry trees lol
 

Big Lew

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Good day DAVE,
Can u imagine someone shooting kids with ''rock salt today.....
they would be on national news/ trudeau would try to ban shotguns/ blair would lead all his ''storm-troopers'' on raids on all farms in western canada and ''lisa laflamme'' would be in tears as she discribed the ''horrific incident '' on cbc news......
OH KANADA ,WHERE DID YOU GO SOOOOO WRONG!!!
Can tell you that it really stings!
 

CanuckShooter

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When in my younger teens my cousin and I would jump the alley fence to pick a few apples off this old fellers tree [Princeton], I don't know what variety they were but they were a good size and green and absolutely delicious. Most of the time he would come out his back door and chase us off, but we always got away with a couple apples.

One day we were walking back to my cousins house and taking the sidewalk up front of his house and he was out there sweeping it. When we were passing by him the old feller smiled a big grin at us and asked us if we enjoyed the apples....I think he got a kick out of chasing us off??
 

Big Lew

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When in my younger teens my cousin and I would jump the alley fence to pick a few apples off this old fellers tree [Princeton], I don't know what variety they were but they were a good size and green and absolutely delicious. Most of the time he would come out his back door and chase us off, but we always got away with a couple apples.

One day we were walking back to my cousins house and taking the sidewalk up front of his house and he was out there sweeping it. When we were passing by him the old feller smiled a big grin at us and asked us if we enjoyed the apples....I think he got a kick out of chasing us off??
Yup, most likely, especially considering most older adults probably had their fair share of fruit raiding themselves.
 

Foxton Gundogs

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Anyone make fire cracker guns? I "hear", they were quiet about of fun with a bag of marbles and a pack of Attoms
 

Big Lew

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Anyone make fire cracker guns? I "hear", they were quiet about of fun with a bag of marbles and a pack of Attoms
I made a long barrelled hand gun out of steamfitter's pipe, elbow, and plug, which was drilled to accept a fuse.
The pipe was heavily taped to a carved wooden grip. We could buy 'bomb' firecrackers which I cut open for the
powder and used the shredded casing for packing. Would install the fuse, screw in the plug end after carefully
packing shredded material around the fuse, pour powder down the barrel, pack it, and then drop in the 'bullet'
before putting in a bit more packing to hold it in place. I first used AA batteries, then progressed to large steel
ball bearings that my dad brought home from his workplace (little did he know I wasn't using them for 'steelie'
marbles. I kept adding more and more powder but it wasn't good enough so I swiped some 22 bullets from him
and mixed their powder in with the firecracker powder. That was enough to blow the steel ball bearing through
heavy clapboard siding on the old barn. Probably was a good thing my best friend's older brother caught us and
took the weapon away before it blew up on us.
 

Bow Walker

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My buddy and I used to make our own brand of powder and test it to make sure we had the mix right..... then we'd make small 'cannons' out of 1/2" galv pipe. Capped off one end, drilled a touch hole, loaded it with BBs or marbles or nails or a mixture of same.

Into the bush just off Holdom St @ E. Georgia. That bush was about 4 acres of heaven for us. We'd go "camping" in there for the day, taking our 'toys', our belt knives, and something to cook over an open fire for lunch.

Many a happy day spent in that bit of bush - bonding, and getting into mischief.
 

CanuckShooter

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cannons and guns? we built a couple of rockets stuffed them with powder mixed up by my buddy with the big science kit. Most of them just fizzled and fell over, but one time it didn't appear to catch so we waited a bit and then went to see why it didn't go off....it blew up in our faces, good thing we didn't suffer any serious injuries.
 

Big Lew

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Another gun I made almost cost me dearly! I attached a 1" pipe, also steam makers. knowing
normal conduit pipe isn't strong and can easily split, to a length of 1"x4" wood. I placed it so
one end protruded off the end enough that I could screw on a joiner section which in turn had
a plug end that was drilled to accept a large spike. The 1"x4" wood was then nailed to a longer
piece of 2"x4". This spike had the sharp end filed to resemble a firing pin. The spike was placed
on 2 sets of nails hammered into the 2"x4" wood at angles to form a cross. The top of the cross
was wired to keep the spike sliding true. A rectangular hole was cut into the 2"x4" behind the spike
so that a trigger would hold the rubber slingshot band containing the spike back far enough to
allow the spike ample speed before hitting the shotgun shell cap that was placed inside the pipe.
That shotgun shell rim fit nicely against the end of the pipe but had enough room inside the joiner
section to slide freely. That was the potential dangerous part of the whole rig as there was about
an inch or more of backwards travel. Not being sure if the contraption would work, I laid the thing
down on a couple of small logs, tied a string to the trigger, and then hid behind a tree before pulling
the string. The homemade gun went off with a tremendous roar. The shot went out the barrel, and
the spike went out the pug in the opposite direction with about the same velocity. That spike would
have gone through my shoulder if I had held the weapon like a real gun.
 

robert5

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Buddy's and I made a cannon out of heavy wall copper pipe, yes not good, but it worked. We made a base and
mounted the barrel on it and the cannon was built to accept 8" bombs with the fuse protruding out the top. Shot
large size marbles out of it.
I have to tell you this little (**) had power. We lined up on the back fence which was 2x6 with an 8' span and blew sucker right of. Also took out to point Atkinson and it would travel at least a quarter of a mile out into the ocean.
Was it not fun being young (**)s!
 

Big Lew

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Went to a bonfire last night. 6 year old girls were learning to safely light bottle rockets, seeing how fun it is to shoot em into a swamp to see the "BLORP" when they explode under water.

All is not lost.
Now that's the way to do it...proper supervision!
 
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