Welcome to True North Outdoor Hunting Forum - British Columbia and Beyond

It looks like you haven't created an account yet. Why not take a minute to register for your own free account now? As a member you get free access to all of our forums and posts plus the ability to post your own messages, communicate directly with other members and much more.

Register Log in

Portable fish finders...

Thread starter #1

Big Lew

This IS My Life
Messages
6,377
Likes
1,400
Location
Mission B.C.
Years ago I had a portable Hummingbird fish finder which I never really found useful in specifically identifying fish
amongst vegetation such as lily pads. It was a very basic unit that showed fish as an arc and displayed rudimentary
bottom contours. I lent it to my daughter and son in law and it got broken (and never replaced)
Apparently the technology has come a long way since then and there now are units that work through your iPhone or
a tablet, show pictures by size, real shape, and even species. They also display all manner of other information.
For those of you that use a portable fish finder for fishing lakes, what has been your experience, do you use the new
age Wi-Fi units, blue tooth units, or the old style units with their own screen? What would you recommend? I am considering
the FishHunter 3D Portable, but there are others as well. They say the Wi-Fi units suck more battery life but are much
faster than the blue tooth technology.
 
L

Leaseman

Guest
The deeper your pockets, the better fisherman you can be Dave! small wink

I have a Garmin 240 (IIRC) on my boat, not portable, probably an antique in todays age as it is over 10 years old....still does what I want, shows me the bottom depressions......

With the advancement of side imaging, never mind other new and improved items, it has taken a lot of the knowledge away from fishing, but then again, that is progress!

You need to think how often you are going to use it, the draw, size, warranty and ease of use...... on fishing sites you see used ones for sale weekly too.......
 

Fowl Language

SIR Dale, The Gander Commander CERTIFIED CB PIG
Messages
2,263
Likes
177
Location
Ladner bc.
all you really need is a sounder that gives you depth and a good sensitivity of the bottom ie. type of bottom , be it sand, mud or how hard the bottom is by density ie rock formation. trees and other obstruction underwater would be a huge help in lakes. i would think forward scanning would be more helpful then side scanning ,similiar to sonar.from there you can learn what bottom the fish like or where they hang around.
 
Thread starter #4

Big Lew

This IS My Life
Messages
6,377
Likes
1,400
Location
Mission B.C.
Many of the new age units use Blue Tooth or Wi Fi and go through your I-Phone or tablet.
The transponder can be attacked to your boat, float tube etc, or it can be cast out to an area
you wish to scrutinize. Some are wireless, and most sell for less than $400, many under $200.
 

KH4

Well-Known Member
Messages
307
Likes
184
Location
Kootenays
I have the humminbird piranhamax 4 di. It's semi portable, as I use it on a kayak and take it on and off, takes 5 min to set up. I think its like $200. the dual imaging gives high defintion to features like sunken logs, etc.

I get the usefulness out of the depths to find drop offs, etc. and to get a general depth of where the fish are hanging out at.

I don't want my phone kicking around on a boat, but I guess you could use an older phone with BT or wifi.
 
Thread starter #6

Big Lew

This IS My Life
Messages
6,377
Likes
1,400
Location
Mission B.C.
I have the humminbird piranhamax 4 di. It's semi portable, as I use it on a kayak and take it on and off, takes 5 min to set up. I think its like $200. the dual imaging gives high defintion to features like sunken logs, etc.

I get the usefulness out of the depths to find drop offs, etc. and to get a general depth of where the fish are hanging out at.

I don't want my phone kicking around on a boat, but I guess you could use an older phone with BT or wifi.
How do you set it up on your kayak? How do you attach and position the transponder? Does the unit come with it's own
separate battery supply?
 

KH4

Well-Known Member
Messages
307
Likes
184
Location
Kootenays
My set up requires an aftermarket holder for the transducer. I could have made one myself, but for the $40 it wasn't worth my time. It's basically an aluminum pole bent at a sweeping 90 (like a hockey stick). the transducer is mounted to the bottom and I have a ram mount ball clamp at the top, ball knob mounted on my kayak. Wire from transducer goes to the head unit, which is either mounted in front of me on the console, or just sitting between my legs on the floor of the kayak. The power goes from the head unit to a 12V battery in a waterproof box I made. Usually you have to make your own power supply for fish finders, or if you have a boat with 12v plugs, it can plug in. Everything wired to easily disconnect. Takes 5min or less to install, 2 min to disconnect everything. Wish I had a photo. I'm not sure you can get really good quality from those wireless bobber style ones, I think they're more of a gimmick than a tool.

https://www.rammount.com/part/RAM-B-316-18-TRA1-TRA1U
 

Bulldog

New Member
Messages
11
Likes
7
I Have the Fishin Buddy Max, uses AA Batteries that last about 15hrs of real fishing time, Shows the water temps,depth and fish. No issues after 3 years.
 

Tuchodi

Well-Known Member
Messages
235
Likes
2
Location
Cariboo BC Canada
I have the Garmin portable Ice 4 it has its own carry case and battery along with a suction cup so I can use it both for summer and in the winter. Got mine from Lone Butte Sporting Goods and they shipped it free.
 
Top Bottom