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Towards Better Accuracy.

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Proper Bow Grip

Your bow-hand (the one that is on the bow handle) should be loose, and relaxed - NOT tight and actually gripping or holding the bow. This is absolutely critical to shooting accuracy.

Study this article very carefully, and practice shooting with a relaxed bow-hand that does not grab the bow in a death grip.

Avoid the Death Grip

By; Russell Thornberry

Lateral torque is largely the product of improper bow hand contact with your bow's grip. If you have problems with erratic arrow flight, hitting right or left of center, chances are you are suffering from improper bow hand contact.

Photo: The shaded portion of the hand illustrates the only part of the bow hand that should contact the grip. The dotted line shows the lifeline in the center of the hand. If the bow hand is turned into the grip, making contact with the lifeline, expect lateral torque to be a problem and be prepared for the string to snap the inside of your forearm.
Shaded.jpg
The bow hand is merely a contact point with the grip -- a fulcrum of sorts. That's why bow grips have steadily been reduced in size over the past years. Most competitive archers take the grips off their bows to further minimize bow hand contact with the riser.

Photo: This shows proper bow hand contact with the grip. Notice that the knuckles form a 45-degree angle in relationship to the riser.
Shaded1.jpg

Proper bow hand contact should never actually grip the grip. Gripping the bow handle is a major no-no. The only part of your bow hand that should contact the grip is the fleshy pad below your thumb. Never allow the lifeline in the middle of your hand to make contact with the grip. When at full draw, the knuckles on your bow hand should form a 45-degree angle with the riser. If your knuckles are vertical, then you've brought your whole hand into the grip, which creates two basic problems: 1) lateral torque, and 2) bow arm contact with the string.

Photo: This shows improper bow hand contact with the grip. Notice that the hand is turned fully into the grip and the vertical attitude of the knuckles.

Shaded2.jpg

The bow hand should be relaxed, and fingers should not be stiff or tense. They should dangle loosely, as opposed to pointing. A rigid bow hand begs for problems. A relaxed bow hand does not.

Attention to the proper bow hand contact will make you a better, more consistent archer, which translates to more bull's-eyes and more venison in the freezer.

Photo: The bow hand should allow the fingers to dangle loosely without tension. Although the fingers need not be splayed so dramatically.
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Photo: Tension in the fingers is a sign that the bow hand is not fully relaxed, contributing to torque problems.
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Photo: Proper bow hand contact with the grip leaves plenty of room between the forearm and the string.
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Photo: Turning the bow hand into the grip reduces clearance and turns the forearm into possible contact with the string.
Shaded6.jpg

-- All photos by Ryan Noffsinger
 
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Here are a few more tips, trick, and hints to get you shooting more accurately....


Shooting Tips via Spot-Hogg Website Newsletters. Here's the link... SPOT-HOGG

Better Accuracy
You can increase the accuracy of your shot by having the bow sit on your thumb pad rather than running down the middle of your hand. There are many tendons in the middle of your hand that can affect your shot. Your thumb pad has very few tendons, therefore increasing your accuracy.

You should also have your fingers loosely curved around your bow; any stiffness in your fingers can also affect the shot.

Don't Blink
Don't blink your eyes when you shoot. Blinking is a form of flinching and it will cause you to miss the spot.

Focus on the Target
When aiming take note of what your eye is focusing on. The target? Your pin or scope? Try to teach your eye to stay focused on one thing throughout the shot. The eye has a tendency to change what it focus's on through the course of the shot. This can confuse our brain and subconscious. The result being no clear message sent to our shooting muscles, which can turn into what is commonly called, "TARGET PANIC"!

Don't Be Touchy
Touching your face with the bowstring can cause string deflection, which in turn can cause inaccuracy depending on the amount of applied pressure. It is best not to touch the string to any part of your body.
 

Big Lew

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"Better Accuracy
You can increase the accuracy of your shot by having the bow sit on your thumb pad rather than running down the middle of your hand. There are many tendons in the middle of your hand that can affect your shot. Your thumb pad has very few tendons, therefore increasing your accuracy."

I was having serious problems with my large forearms getting hit by the bow string even though
I was holding my bow without fingers gripping it. Using a forearm pad wasn't the answer for two
reasons. First, if the bow string touched or hit the pad, of course accuracy was effected. Secondly,
the bow string on a few occasions actually hit the end of the pad,, partly ripping it off my arm and
damaging it. I went in and had a chat with Mr Boorman of Boorman Archery in New Westminster.
He told me that at one time he had the same problem (he also has big forearms) so he changes the
way he held his bow. He holds his bow against the thumb pad while loosely curling his second, third,
and fourth fingers into his fist. This automatically forces his arm to twist the elbow away from the bow
string, giving ample room for the shot. I did that and found it worked very well...so well in fact that
there is absolutely no reason to wear a protective pad anymore. It also improved my overall consistency.
 
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Another thing to make sure of is that your bow-arm shoulder is relaxed and in a natural position - not tensed or hunched up.

Also - a 'low' bow hand grip will bring your elbow in, rather than letting it relax and stay outward from the string. By low grip, I mean having the hand slightly cocked backwards (or upwards) as happens when your palm heel is on the bow grip instead of you thumb pad.
 

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